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Benchmark Videos

Counting Crackers (IEL Video) AboutLanguage Arts, Mathematics, Social/Emotional Development

Video & Background

Video length: 0:30

Children in this mixed-age early childhood center are taking part in open snack. The snack bar is open for about 45 minutes. Children prepare their snack at the snack bar (a table) and then carry it to a designated snack table to eat it. Pitchers of drinks, cups, napkins, and utensils are available at the snack table. Sometimes there are bowls of additional food set out on the snack table with a rebus instruction card. The children in this clip discuss the rebus instructions about the number of crackers to take. After Clare demonstrates counting out four crackers, others follow suit.

Snack time can be a wonderful time for conversation. In this case, it is also a great opportunity for math and literacy experiences.

This video clip was made possible by STARnet Regions I & III with funding from the Illinois State Board of Education.

Transcript

Travis (4.4 years old): Do you have 5? You get 4 (standing and pointing to cue card). Do you get 4?

Clare (4.11 years old): I know how to count to four—1, 2, 3, 4 (transfers a cracker from the serving bowl to her napkin for each number she says).

(Justin, 3.7 years old, takes 4 crackers from the serving bowl and lines them up to the right of his bowl as Clare counts.)

Travis: (To Clare.) Hey, you took it! (Slides the bowl back toward his place and begins to count out crackers.)

Benchmarks

Benchmark How Benchmark Was Met
2.C.ECa Interact with a variety of types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems, rhymes, songs). Travis referred to symbols on the cue card when he reminded classmates that they should take 4 crackers, not 5. 
4.D.ECa Recognize own name and common signs and labels in the environment.View sample lesson plan The children knew that the symbols on the card stood for crackers.
6.A.ECa Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in small sets up to 5. Children discussed and counted the crackers. Clare counted aloud to 4. Justin lined up 4 crackers next to his bowl.
6.A.ECd Connect numbers to quantities they represent using physical models and informal representations. Clare, Travis, and Justin used crackers to count with one-to-one correspondence.
30.C.ECc Show some initiative, self-direction, and independence in actions. The children independently prepared their snacks and came to the snack table. Clare volunteered to demonstrate counting.

This section of the Illinois Early Learning Web site links to activities related to the Benchmarks in the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. We expect that early childhood professionals and parents will use these ideas in ways appropriate to their children and their setting. We are sure that you will find many ways to adapt these activities into themes, projects, and units in your program or at home.

An Illinois Early Learning link to a Web site does not imply an endorsement by the Illinois Early Learning Project or the Illinois State Board of Education of any product, resource, or service on that Web site.

This section of the Illinois Early Learning Web site links to activities related to the Benchmarks in the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. We expect that early childhood professionals and parents will use these ideas in ways appropriate to their children and their setting. We are sure that you will find many ways to adapt these activities into themes, projects, and units in your program or at home.

An Illinois Early Learning link to a Web site does not imply an endorsement by the Illinois Early Learning Project or the Illinois State Board of Education of any product, resource, or service on that Web site.

Disclaimer

The opinions, resources, and referrals provided on the IEL Web site are intended for informational purposes only and are not intended to take the place of medical or legal advice, or of other appropriate services. We encourage you to seek direct local assistance from a qualified professional if necessary before taking action.

The content of the IEL Web site does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Illinois Early Learning Project, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or the Illinois State Board of Education; nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the Illinois Early Learning Project, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or the Illinois State Board of Education.

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