2013 Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) provide reasonable expectations for children’s growth, development, and learning in the preschool years. When used as part of the curriculum, the IELDS provide guidance to teachers in early childhood programs to create and sustain developmentally appropriate experiences for young children that will strengthen their intellectual dispositions and support their continuing success as learners and students. The age-appropriate benchmarks in the IELDS enable educators to reflect upon and evaluate the experiences they provide for all preschool children.

Preface

 

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) provide reasonable expectations for children’s growth, development, and learning in the preschool years. When used as part of the curriculum, the IELDS provide guidance to teachers in early childhood programs to create and sustain developmentally appropriate experiences for young children that will strengthen their intellectual dispositions and support their continuing success as learners and students. The age-appropriate benchmarks in the IELDS enable educators to reflect upon and evaluate the experiences they provide for all preschool children.

There are cautions to consider when implementing the IELDS. They are meant to be used to enhance planning for preschool children, to enrich play-based curricular practices, and to support the growth of each child to his or her fullest potential. They are not meant to push down curriculum and expectations from higher grades. The IELDS are research-based, so they identify expectations that are just right for preschool children.

As teachers in early childhood programs implement the IELDS, they can be guided by Dr. Lilian Katz, internationally known early childhood leader, expert, and professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her reminder to expand our thinking beyond just the IELDS themselves and also consider “standards of experiences” is an important message for all.

Dr. Katz writes:

As we think about standards, I suggest we ask ourselves: “What are the standards of experience that we want all of our children to have?” Below is a very preliminary list of some important “standards of experiences” that should be provided for all young children in all programs.

Young children should frequently have the following experiences:

  • Being intellectually engaged, absorbed, challenged.
  • Having confidence in their own intellectual powers and their own questions.
  • Being engaged in extended interactions (e.g., conversations, discussions, exchanges of views, arguments, planning).
  • Being involved in sustained investigations of aspects of their own environment worthy of their interest, knowledge, understanding.
  • Taking initiative in a range of activities and accepting responsibility for what is accomplished.
  • Knowing the satisfaction that can come from overcoming obstacles and setbacks and solving problems.
  • Helping others to find out things and to understand them better.
  • Making suggestions to others and expressing appreciation of others’ eff†orts and accomplishments.
  • Applying their developing basic literacy and numeracy skills in purposeful ways.
  • Feelings of belonging to a group of their peers.

The list is derived from general consideration of the kinds of experiences that all children should have much of the time in our educational settings. It is based on philosophical commitments as well as the best available empirical evidence about young children’s learning and development.

If the focus of program evaluation and assessment is on “outcomes” such as those indicated by test scores, then evaluators and assessors would very likely emphasize the “drill and practice” of phonemics, or rhyming, or various kinds of counting, or introductory arithmetic. While in and of themselves such experiences are not necessarily harmful to young children, they overlook the kinds of experiences that are most likely to strengthen and support young children’s intellectual dispositions and their innate thirst for better, fuller, and deeper understanding of their own experiences. A curriculum or teaching method focused on academic goals emphasizes the acquisition of bits of knowledge and overlooks the centrality of understanding as an educational goal. After all, literacy and numeracy skills are not ends in themselves but basic tools that can and should be applied in the quest for understanding. In other words, children should be helped to acquire academic skills in the service of their intellectual dispositions and not at their expense.

Dr. Lilian Katz, professor emeritus
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
November 2012

Introduction

 

I am pleased to introduce to you the revised Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards 2013 (IELDS), formerly known as the Illinois Early Learning Standards. The purpose of the updated IELDS is to assist the Illinois early childhood community in providing high-quality programs and services for children age 3 years to kindergarten enrollment (as defined in Section 10-20-2012 of the School Code).

The standards are organized to parallel content in the Illinois State Goals for Learning (see 23 Illinois Administrative Code 1. Appendix D (PDF)). The revised standards also demonstrate alignment to the Illinois Kindergarten Standards and the Common Core State Standards for Kindergarten. (For specifics, see the Kindergarten Common Core Language Standards and the Kindergarten Common Core Mathematics.)

The original Illinois Early Learning Standards document, published in 2002, was developed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) with assistance from the Chicago Public Schools, DeKalb Community Unit School District, Indian Prairie School District, and Rockford Public School District.

The development of the revised IELDS includes additional assistance from the Erikson Institute in Chicago as well as eight content-area experts who are nationally and internationally known leaders in the field of early childhood education.

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards are broad statements that provide teachers with reasonable expectations for children’s development in the preschool years. Based on the broad Illinois State Goals and Standards (see Illinois Administrative Code, Section 235, Appendix A), this resource includes Preschool Benchmarks and Performance Descriptors for most Learning Standards. It is critical to remember that while these standards represent an alignment with the K-12 standards, the IELDS are not a “push-down” of the curriculum; rather, they are a developmentally appropriate set of goals and objectives for young children. Early learners must develop basic skills, understandings, and attitudes toward learning before they can be successful in the K-12 curriculum.

The challenge when describing children’s development in various domains is to accurately convey the degree to which development and learning are interconnected across and within domains. An integrated approach to curriculum recognizes that content areas of instruction are naturally interrelated, as they are in real life experiences. Curriculum should reflect a conceptual organization that helps all children make good sense of their experiences.

The revised IELDS were reviewed and critiqued by early childhood professionals from public and private schools, Head Start, colleges, and community-based early care and learning programs. Recommendations from these stakeholders and users were considered and incorporated into the revisions. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) acknowledges and is grateful for the very thoughtful and knowledgeable comments that have helped shape these standards.

Sincerely,
Cindy Zumwalt
Division Administrator
Early Childhood Education
Illinois State Board of Education

Development, Purposes, and Uses

 

Development, Purposes, and Uses of the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards

Development

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (2013) are a revised version of the original Illinois Early Learning Standards published in 2002. They have been updated to align with the Illinois Early Learning Guidelines for Children Birth to Age 3, with the Illinois Kindergarten Standards, and with the Common Core State Standards for Kindergarten.

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) were developed in collaboration with key Illinois stakeholders in the preschool education field. Early childhood leaders, educators, practitioners, and policy experts came together to ensure the creation of an accessible, user-friendly document, presenting evidence-based and up-to-date information on preschool development for parents and family members, teachers, early childhood professionals, and policy makers. The goal is to ensure a document that aligns with and integrates into the complex system of services for children in multiple preschool settings in the state and fulfills the ultimate goals of improving program quality and strengthening the current systems. The IELDS are designed to be used with children from ages 3 to 5 or those in the two years before their kindergarten year. The term preschool is used rather than prekindergarten to recognize the inclusion of these two years instead of only addressing the one year before kindergarten. In addition, the term teacher is used to refer to any adult who works with preschool children in any early childhood setting.

From January to May 2013, a statewide field test of the IELDS was conducted. More than 300 participants reviewed and implemented the standards in their preschool environments and provided feedback through focus group webinars. The field test participants included teachers and administrators from state funded Preschool for All programs, Head Start, center-based child care, family child care, special education, faith-based preschools, and park district programs. The comments and recommendations from the field test were reviewed by a work group and, when appropriate, incorporated into this final document. This collaborative approach in finalizing the IELDS allowed for important decisions to be made by a diverse range of professionals representing different areas of the field.

Purposes

As with the Illinois Early Learning Guidelines for Children Birth to Age 3, there are multiple purposes for the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. The IELDS:

  1. Create a foundational understanding for families and teachers of what children from 3 through 5 years of age are expected to know and do across multiple developmental domains.
  2. Improve the quality of care and learning through more intentional and appropriate practices to support development from 3 through 5 years of age.
  3. Provide support for a qualified workforce.
  4. Enhance the state’s early childhood services by aligning preschool standards with existing guidelines or standards for younger and older children.
  5. Serve as a resource for those involved in developing and implementing policies for children from 3 through 5 years of age.

Uses

The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards are designed to provide a cohesive analysis of children’s development with common expectations and common language. They are broad statements that provide teachers with useful information and direction that are needed as part of the daily early childhood environment. Preschool educators can refer to the IELDS when determining appropriate expectations for preschoolers, when planning for individual children’s needs, when implementing a play-based curriculum, and when using authentic observational assessment procedures.

There are appropriate and inappropriate uses of the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. The IELDS are not intended to be a curriculum or assessment tool and are not an exhaustive resource or checklist for children’s development.

Terminology

 

Terminology in the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards

The primary goal of the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) is to provide a comprehensive resource of reasonable expectations for the development of children in the preschool years (ages 3 to 5) for all teachers across the state of Illinois. All domains or areas of development are included so the focus is on the whole child.

Throughout the IELDS, terms are used to name the various components of the standards and to describe the ways that preschool children show what they know and can do related to specific benchmarks in each domain. It is important that teachers using the IELDS become familiar with this terminology so they can understand the standards and use them in ways that are best for children. In this way, no matter in what community or part of the state a teacher is working with young children, s/he will be looking at the standards with the same understanding and application as teachers elsewhere. This consistency of understanding makes application of the standards much more reliable from teacher to teacher.

The following terms describe the major components or are used in the Introduction, Development, Purposes, and Guiding Principles sections of the IELDS. In addition, action words that are used throughout the preschool benchmarks (across all domains) are defined.

Major Components of the IELDS

  • Common Core State Standards Alignment
    In the learning areas/domains of Language Arts and Mathematics, the IELDS Preschool Benchmarks have been aligned with the kindergarten standards in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative for Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade. These standards were developed in a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) in partnership with Achieve (NAEYC, 2012, p. 2). They are referred to as “the Common Core” and have been adopted by 45 states, including Illinois.
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP)
    These are recommended practices adopted by the National Association for the Education of Young Children for the care and education of young children from birth through age 8 (Copple & Bredekamp, 2009). Such practices address three key concerns:
    1) What is known about child development and learning specific to different age groups from birth through age 8?
    2) What is known about each child as an individual?
    3) What is known about the social and cultural contexts in which children live?
    When a Learning Standard in the IELDS is determined to be “not applicable,” it is because it does not match what is known about what’s appropriate for preschool-age children.
  • Goal
    Provides an overview of or general statement about learning in the learning area/domain. Many of the goals in the IELDS are consistent and aligned for all grade levels from preschool through high school in the state of Illinois, but some goals in the IELDS are only appropriate for the preschool level.
  • Learning Areas/Domains
    Reflect universal aspects of child development or subject areas for education from preschool through high school. There are eight learning areas/domains in the IELDS. Most are consistent and aligned for all grade levels from preschool through high school. In the state of Illinois, these subject areas are Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Development and Health, The Arts, English Language Learner Home Language Development, and Social/Emotional Development.
  • Learning Standard
    Defines what students/children should know and be able to do. Like the state goals, many learning standards in the IELDS are aligned for all grade levels, preschool through high school. However, not all learning standards are considered developmentally appropriate for the preschool years and are identified as “Not applicable.” In some instances, the learning standards have been revised so they are appropriate only for the preschool level.
  • Performance Descriptors
    Give examples that describe small steps of progress that children may demonstrate as they work toward preschool benchmarks. They are not intended to replace the IELDS nor are they all-inclusive. They are a resource for voluntary use at the local level to enable teachers to better recognize age-appropriate guidelines and expectations for preschool children. There are three levels of performance descriptors in the IELDS: Exploring (the first level where a child is just beginning to show some of the aspects of the benchmark), Developing (the second level where the child is beginning to show more understanding or related skills), and Building (the description of how a child demonstrates the benchmark as it is written). A child does not have to master or perform every descriptor to show mastery of the preschool benchmark. And, a child may demonstrate his or her capabilities related to a specific preschool benchmark in a different way than described in the performance descriptors.
  • Preschool Benchmarks
    Provide teachers with specific ways that preschool children demonstrate learning standards. The benchmarks are unique to preschool children. Learning standards deemed “not applicable” do not have identified preschool benchmarks.

Terms Used in the Introduction, Development, Purposes, and Guiding Principles Sections of the IELDS

  • Adaptation or Accommodation
    A change in the implementation of a curricular strategy that best meets the needs of a child.
  • Appropriate Curriculum
    Curricular practices that match the age group of the children as well as adapt to meet individual needs and respect cultural differences.
  • Assessment Tool
    The IELDS is not an assessment tool. There are many commercially developed research-based checklists and locally designed materials that teachers can use in observational assessment practices to determine how each child is learning and growing across multiple domains. It is important for teachers to make sure that the assessment tool they are using is aligned with the IELDS.
  • Authentic Observational Assessment Procedures
    Assessments based on teachers observing children in everyday activities including play, daily routines, and large- and small-group times. Teachers determine best ways to document their observations and relate them back to the developmental expectations or the IELDS.
  • Challenging Areas
    The capabilities or skills that are more difficult for a child or that s/he has to work hard on in order to accomplish them.
  • Challenging Experiences
    Experiences that are at the edge of a child’s capabilities but not overly frustrating or overwhelming.
  • Checklist for Children’s Development
    The IELDS is not a checklist for children’s development. It is a resource for preschool teachers in the state of Illinois to define reasonable, agreed-upon expectations for preschool children. Teachers may use research-based checklists that have been aligned to the IELDS for assessment purposes.
  • Child-Initiated Activities
    Activities that a child independently chooses to do and determines how to proceed.
  • Child’s Individuality
    The unique characteristics about a child, such as personality, learning style, health issues, family and cultural background, interests, strengths, and challenges.
  • Construct Understanding
    As children play and explore, they figure out how things work and come to conclusions for themselves that they continue to test and refine.
  • Curriculum
    “Curriculum is everything that goes on in a program from the moment a child arrives until she leaves. Teachers plan, implement, observe, reflect, and make adjustments based on individual children’s needs and the needs of the group. Curriculum is an ongoing process that requires teachers to think about child development, to observe how the children in their classroom are learning and growing, and to make hundreds of decisions about the best ways to help them reach their full potential.” (Gronlund, 2013, p. 31)
  • Developmental Delay or Disability
    A significant lag in a child’s development identified by specialists through formal assessment procedures.
  • Dynamic Interaction of Areas of Development
    Development in one domain influences development in other domains. As children demonstrate what they know and can do, they show their skills and capabilities in integrated ways rather than in isolation.
  • Evidence-based
    Educational practices based on research that supports their effectiveness.
  • Exhaustive Resource
    The IELDS is not an exhaustive resource. The document does not capture every single aspect of child development in the preschool years. Rather, it identifies the significant benchmarks in multiple domains that the state of Illinois has deemed appropriate for preschool teachers to incorporate into the curriculum for young children.
  • Growth Patterns
    Identified trends in children’s development of skills and capabilities in various domains and in accomplishment of benchmarks.
  • High Expectations
    Expectations that are appropriate for leading the development of young children and help teachers determine goals for planning.
  • Individualized Education Program (IEP)
    A legal document that identifies the delay or disability that qualifies a child for special education services, the type of services to be provided, the goals for such services, and any accommodations needed to assist a child.
  • Intentional Practices
    Teaching with purpose, with goals in mind for the group of children as well as for each individual child, and being planful in implementing those goals in a variety of ways in a preschool program.
  • Parents or Family Members
    The primary caregivers of the child in his or her home setting.
  • Play
    Opportunities for children to explore, investigate, and discover things about their world and themselves. Play requires an interesting, well-organized environment and ample time for children to get deeply engaged. Teachers act as facilitators and coaches as children play.
  • Play-based Curriculum
    Curricular practices that incorporate a significant portion of the day for children to play with materials and with other children while teachers facilitate and guide the play so it is beneficial and full of learning opportunities for the children. A planned and organized environment is an important part of play-based curriculum with interesting and engaging materials and clear purposes for their use (e.g., dress-up clothes for dramatic play, blocks for building, art materials for creating).
  • Prekindergarten
    A program that serves children in the year before their kindergarten year.
  • Preschool
    A program that serves children from ages 3 to 5 or in the two years before their kindergarten year.
  • Proficiency or Mastery
    Being very good at or accomplishing the skills or application of skills identified in a benchmark.
  • Programmatic Goals
    The overall goals a preschool has for the children who attend (e.g., to love learning, to get along with others, to gain preschool skills in all domains).
  • Range of Skills and Competencies
    The levels or strengths and weaknesses of children’s performance in various domains.
  • Reasonable Expectations
    Expectations that are appropriate for the age of the children. The IELDS standards and benchmarks were designed and reviewed by nationally recognized content experts.
  • Scaffolding or Assistance
    The help or support a teacher (or a peer) gives to a child as s/he engages in a challenging experience that is not quite in his or her range of competency.
  • Strengths
    The capabilities or skills that are easy for a child or that s/he does very well.
  • Teacher-initiated Activities
    Activities that the teacher has chosen, designed, or invited children’s participation in and/or leads.
  • Teachers, Early Childhood Professionals
    Any adult who works with preschool children in any type of early childhood program or setting.
  • Work Collaboratively with Families
    To join in partnership with families determining mutual goals that are in the child’s best interests.

Action Words Used Throughout the Preschool Benchmarks

  • Begin to
    To take initial steps or actions or demonstrate something inconsistently.
  • Compare
    To examine or consider something (an object, a person, an idea, etc.) for similarities and differences.
  • Demonstrate
    To show through actions and/or words understanding of a concept or ability to perform a skill.
  • Describe
    To tell about something in words (an object, a person, an experience, etc.).
  • Develop
    To become more capable at a skill, to add more detail to a verbally expressed idea, to create something with a beginning point and add to it.
  • Differentiate
    To determine what is not the same through actions and/or words.
  • Discuss
    To talk with others.
  • Engage
    To become involved in or take part in an activity of some sort.
  • Exhibit
    To demonstrate understanding or capability to others through words and/or actions.
  • Explore or Experiment With
    To interact with a set of materials or items to discover their characteristics and possibilities, to try things out through trial and error, or to test a particular hypothesis.
  • Express
    To communicate with others through facial expressions, gestures, words, and/or actions.
  • Identify
    To verbally name, label, or, in some cases, to point to or act upon showing understanding of an expressed question to distinguish certain items.
  • Name
    To verbally identify or label.
  • Participate
    To join others in an activity, conversation, or discussion.
  • Recite
    To say something that has a set pattern, such as the alphabet or the counting order of numbers.
  • Recognize
    To show understanding of distinctive items, such as numerals, letters, or shapes by naming, identifying, grouping, touching, and/or pointing to them.
  • Show
    To demonstrate understanding of a concept or ability to perform a skill through actions and/ or words.
  • Understand
    To comprehend the meaning of a concept or term and use words or actions accordingly to demonstrate such comprehension.

Guiding Principles

 

Early learning and development are multidimensional. Developmental domains are highly interrelated.
Development in one domain influences development in other domains. For example, a child’s language skills affect his or her ability to engage in social interactions. Therefore, developmental domains cannot be considered in isolation from each other. The dynamic interaction of all areas of development must be considered. Standards and preschool benchmarks listed for each domain could also be cited in different domains.

Young children are capable and competent.
All children are potentially capable of positive developmental outcomes. Regardless of children’s backgrounds and experiences, teachers are intentional in matching goals and experiences to children’s learning and development and in providing challenging experiences to promote each child’s progress and interest. There should be high expectations for all young children so that teachers help them to reach their fullest potential.

Children are individuals who develop at different rates.
Each child is unique. Each grows and develops skills and competencies at his or her own pace. Teachers get to know each child well and differentiate their curricular planning to recognize the rate of development for each child in each domain. Some children may have an identified developmental delay or disability that may require teachers to adapt the expectations set out in the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards and to make accommodations in experiences. Goals set for children who have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) reflect these adaptations and accommodations so that individual children can be supported as they work toward particular preschool benchmarks.

Children will exhibit a range of skills and competencies in any domain of development.
All children within an age group should not be expected to arrive at each preschool benchmark at the same time or to show mastery to the same degree. Children may show strengths in some domains and be more challenged in others. Teachers recognize each child’s individuality and plan curricular strategies that support the child as a learner by building on his or her strengths and providing scaff€olding and support in more challenging areas. There is no expectation that every child will master every preschool benchmark. Teachers work with children to meet them where they are and help them continue to make small steps of progress toward each preschool benchmark. There also is recognition that some children may go beyond mastery of the preschool expectations. Teachers plan for challenging experiences for these children to help them continue to grow, develop, and learn.

Knowledge of how children grow and develop—together with expectations that are consistent with growth patterns—are essential to develop, implement, and maximize the benefits of educational experiences for children.
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards provide reasonable expectations for preschool children (ages 3 to 5). They give teachers a common language—defining what they can expect preschool children to know and be able to do within the context of child growth and development. With this knowledge, teachers can make sound decisions about appropriate curriculum for the group and for individual children.

Young children learn through active exploration of their environment in child-initiated and teacher-initiated activities.
Early childhood teachers recognize that children’s play is a highly supportive context for development and learning. The early childhood environment should provide opportunities for children to explore materials, engage in activities, and interact with peers and adults to construct understanding of the world around them. There should, therefore, be a balance of child-initiated and teacher-initiated activities to maximize learning. Teachers act as guides and facilitators most of the time, carefully planning the environment and helping children explore and play in productive, meaningful ways. They incorporate the preschool benchmarks into all play areas, daily routines, and teacher-led activities.

Families are the primary caregivers and educators of young children. Teachers communicate in a variety of ongoing ways with families to inform them of programmatic goals, experiences that are best provided for preschool children, and expectations for their performance by the end of the preschool years. Teachers and families work collaboratively to ensure that children are provided optimal learning experiences.

Note:Adapted from Preschool Curriculum Framework and Benchmarks for Children in Preschool Programs (1999).

How to Navigate

 

The 2013 Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards has eight main sections: Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Development and Health, The Arts, English Language Learner Home Language Development, and Social/Emotional Development. Each section has five different components:

  1. Learning Area/Domains are listed at the top of each page. The “English Language Learner Home Language Development” learning area has replaced the “Foreign Language” learning area. Each learning area has a brief introduction.
  2. Goals provide an overview of the subject or learning area. Goals are the most general statements about learning. Some of the goals are consistent and aligned for all grade levels, prekindergarten through high school. Others are more specific to the preschool years.
  3. Learning Standards are aligned under each goal and define what students/children should know, understand, and be able to do. Like the goals, the learning standard remains the same for most of the document for all grade levels, prekindergarten through high school, while some are more specific to the preschool years.
  4. Preschool Benchmarks provide teachers with specific ways that preschool children demonstrate learning standards. Learning standards deemed “not applicable” do not have preschool benchmarks.
  5. Example Performance Descriptors give examples that describe small steps of progress that children may demonstrate as they work toward preschool benchmarks. There are three levels of performance descriptors: Exploring, Developing, and Building. A child does not have to master or perform every descriptor to show mastery of the preschool benchmark. (Click below for an example.)

Example Performance Descriptors

EXPLORINGDEVELOPINGBUILDING
Perform one-step directions stated orally (e.g., “Throw your paper towel in the trash can.”).Perform two-step directions stated orally (e.g., “Get your coats on and line up to go outside.”).Perform three-step directions stated orally (e.g., “Put your paper in your cubby, wash your hands, and come sit on the rug.”).
Answer simple questions stated orally with a simple reply (e.g., “yes,” “no”).Respond to simple questions stated orally with appropriate actions (e.g., “Did you remember to wash your hands?” and the child goes to the sink and washes hands).Respond to simple questions stated orally with appropriate actions and comments (e.g., “Did you remember to wash your hands?” and the child says “Oh, I forgot!” and goes to the sink and washes hands).
Make one comment that is related to the topic of the conversation or discussion (e.g., “I have a dog, too.”).Make more than one comment related to the topic of the conversation or discussion (e.g., “I have a dog, too. His name is Champ.”).Make comments and ask questions that are related to the topic of the conversation or discussion (e.g., “I have a dog, too. His name is Champ. What’s your dog’s name?”).
Look at a person’s face or body language and ask how s/he feels (e.g., “What’s wrong with her, teacher? Did she get hurt?”).Look at a person’s face to determine how they feel (e.g., “She looks mad.”).Look at a person’s body language to determine how they are feeling (e.g., “He’s sitting there all by himself. I think he’s sad, teacher.”).

 

Many sections also have notes that show how specific goals, standards, or benchmarks align with the Common Core State Standards or K–12 Illinois Learning Standards.

References/Resources

 

A

  • Adams, M. J. (1994). Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Althouse, R., Johnson, M. H., & Mitchell, S. T. (2003). The colors of learning: Integrating the visual arts into the early childhood curriculum. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Andrews, A., & Trafton, P. R. (2002). Little kids—powerful problem solvers: Math stories from a kindergarten classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Anstrom, K. (1997, Summer/Fall). Native language literacy: Is it just another option? National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, Early Childhood Update.

B

  • Barclay, K., Hutinger, P., Johanson, J., Bosworth, J., Hamlin, S., Richmond, … Settles, S. (1996). Emergent literacy program and support services. Macomb: Macomb Projects, Western Illinois University.
  • Baroody, A. J., & Coslick, R. T. (1998). Fostering children’s mathematical power: An investigative approach to K-8 mathematics instruction. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Baroody, A. J., & Dowker, A. (Eds.). (2003). The development of arithmetic concepts and skills: Constructing adaptive expertise. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Barratta-Lorton, M. (1977). Mathematics their way. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley.
  • Bialystok, E. (2009). Bilingualism: The good, the bad, and the indifferent. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 12, 3–11.
  • Bialystok, E., & Feng, X. (2010). Language proficiency and its implications for monolingual and bilingual children. In A. Y. Durgunoğlu & C. Goldenberg (Eds.), Language and literacy development in bilingual settings (pp. 121–138). New York: Guilford Press.
  • Bowman, B. T. (1990). Educating language-minority children. Urbana, IL: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education.
  • Bowman, B. T., Donovan, M. S., & Burns,M. S. (Eds.). (2001). Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  • Boyd, J., Barnett, W. S., Bodrova, E., Leong, D. J., & Gomby, D. (2005, March). Promoting children’s social and emotional development through preschool (Preschool Policy Brief). New Brunswick, NJ: National Institute for Early Education Research, Rutgers University.
  • Bredekamp, S., & Copple, C. (Eds.). (1997). Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs (Rev. ed.). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.
  • Bredekamp, S., & Rosegrant, T. (Eds.). (1992). Reaching potentials: Transforming early childhood curriculum and assessment (Vol. 2). Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.
  • Bridwell, N. (1995). Clifford the big red dog. New York: Cartwheel.
  • Burns, M. S., Griffin, P., & Snow, C. E. (Eds.). (1999). Starting out right: A guide to promoting children’s success. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

C

  • Cadwell, L. B. (1997). Bringing Reggio Emilia home: An innovative approach to early childhood education. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Campbell, R. (1998). Looking at literacy learning in preschool settings. In R. Campbell (Ed.), Facilitating preschool literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (1999). Children’s mathematics: Cognitively guided instruction. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Checkpoints for progress in reading and writing for teachers and learning partners. (1997). Developed by a Subgroup of the America Reads Challenge: READ*WRITE*NOW. United States Department of Education.
  • Child assessment profile. (1999). Chicago Public Schools.
  • Clements, D. H. (1999a). Geometric and spatial thinking in young children. In J. V. Copley (Ed.), Mathematics in the early years (pp. 66–79). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
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Acknowledgments

 

Content-area Experts

Thank you to the content-area experts who reviewed, and edited, their respective learning areas—focusing on what is best and developmentally appropriate for preschool children:

  • Dr. Kathy Barclay, Western Illinois University, Macomb
  • Dr. Sallee Beneke, St. Ambrose University, IA
  • Dr. Linda Espinosa, University of Missouri
  • Dr. Judy Harris Helm, Best Practices, Inc., Brimfield, IL
  • Dr. Lilian Katz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Dr. Jennifer McCray, Erikson Institute, Chicago
  • Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
  • Dr. Stephen Virgilio, Adelphi University, NY

Acknowledgments—Participants

Thank you to the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards workgroup members, to those who were part of the infancy stages of the revision process—through and/or including the development planning for the workshops to train practioners. Their contribution of time, thoughtful feedback, and commitment, in whatever way, is sincerely appreciated.

  • Samantha Aigner-Treworgy, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
  • Shannon Alamia, Children’s Learning Center, DeKalb
  • Julie Allen, Skip-A-Long Child Development, Moline
  • Arthur Baroody, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Karen Berman, Ounce of Prevention Fund , Chicago
  • Jill Calkins, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
  • Madeline Cancel-Hanieh, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • Jeanna Capito, Positive Parenting DuPage, Warrenville
  • Pat Chamberlain, Chamberlain Educational Consulting, Inc, Elgin
  • Rhonda Clark, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
  • Kim Collins, Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development, Chicago
  • Denise Conkright, PACT for Central Illinois, Mount Sterling
  • Julia Cotter, Livingston County Special Services Unit, Pontiac
  • Carol Crum, Cook County SD 130, Blue Island
  • Isolda Davila, City of Chicago Children & Youth Services
  • Kathy Davis, District 186 – Early Start Pre-K, Springfield
  • Debbie Ditchen, Heartland Head Start, Bloomington
  • Natalie Doyle, Rock Island County ROE, Moline
  • Claire Dunham, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
  • Donna Emmons, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
  • Lisa Fisher, Early Childhood Consultant, Naperville
  • Theresa Hawley, Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development, Chicago
  • Denise Henry, STARNET Region IV, Belleville
  • Reyna Hernandez, Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago
  • Linda Housewright, Preschool for All Coach and Consultant, Dallas City
  • Denise Jordan, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • Beth Knight, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
  • Terri Lawrence, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
  • Tom Layman, Illinois Action for Children, Chicago
  • Kathleen Liffick, Champaign County Head Start, Champaign
  • Lori Longueville, Child Care Resource & Referral, Carterville
  • Heather Madden, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
  • Cathy Main, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Stephen Marlette, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
  • Jan Maruna, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
  • Elizabeth Mascitti-Miller, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
  • Rebecca McBroom, Kankakee SD 111/Head Start, Kankakee
  • Louisiana Melendez, Erikson Institute , Chicago
  • Paulette Mercurius, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • Brian Michalski, Illinois Resource Center: Early Childhood, Arlington Heights
  • Libby Mitchell, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
  • Lauri Morrison-Frichtl, Illinois Head Start Association, Springfield
  • Marta Moya-Leang, Belmont-Cragin Early Childhood Center, City of Chicago School District 299
  • Kimberly Nelson, Rockford Public Schools District 205, Rockford
  • Kristie Norwood, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
  • Tamara Notter, Child Care Resource & Referral, Joliet
  • Donna Nylander, Valley View Early Childhood Center, Romeoville
  • Jeanine O’Nan Brownell, Erikson Institute, Chicago
  • Charles Parr, Riverbend Head Start & Family Services, Alton
  • Jenine Patty, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
  • Pam Reising Rechner, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
  • Vanessa Rich, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • Diane Richey, SIU – Southern Region Early Childhood Programs, Carbondale
  • Allen Rosales, Christopher House, Chicago
  • Elizabeth Sherwood, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
  • Connie Shugart, STARNET Regions I & III, Macomb
  • Katherine Slattery, STARNET Region II, Arlington Heights
  • Loukisha Smart-Pennix, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • Penelope Smith, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
  • Erin Stout, Peoria County Bright Futures, Peoria Heights
  • Kathy Villano, Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment Center, The Center, Arlington Heights
  • Laurie Walker, Skip-A-Long Child Development, Moline
  • Amy Weseloh, Fox Valley Home Day Care, Batavia
  • Maureen Whalen, Woodford County Special Education Association/Bright Beginnings, Metamora
  • Karen Yarbrough, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
  • Cindy Zumwalt, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield

Acknowledgments—Field Test Participants

Thank you to the programs and practitioners that field tested the revised IELDS in their program settings. Their enthusiasm and eagerness to provide feedback was contagious and exemplified their commitment and dedication to the work they do for children and families throughout Illinois.

Illinois Early Learning Standards Participant List

This list also includes those who participated in the development of the original standards.

* Indicates participation in the 2013 revisions and field testing.

  • * ABC Preschool, Decatur
  • * Alton Day Care & Learning Center, Alton
  • * Anna’s Daycare, St. Charles
  • * Anne M. Jeans Pre-K, CCSD 180, Willowbrook
  • * Archdiocese of Chicago, Office of Catholic Schools, Chicago
  • Argenta-Oreana CUSD 1, Argenta
  • * As We Grow Preschool, Oswego
  • * Atwood Hammond CUSD 39, Atwood
  • Aurora West CUSD 129, Aurora
  • Avon CUSD 176, Avon
  • Ball-Chatham CUSD 5, Chatham
  • * Barrington Early Learning Center/Barrington SD 220, Barrington
  • BCMW Head Start, Centralia
  • * Bellwood SD 88, Bellwood
  • * Belmont-Cragin Early Childhood Center/CPS District 299, Chicago
  • Belvidere CUSD 100, Belvidere
  • Bethalto CUSD 8, Bethalto
  • * Bizzy Bee’s Family Child Care, Carpentersville
  • * Blessed Beginnings Preschool, Aurora
  • Bloomington SD 87, Bloomington
  • Blue Ridge CUSD 18, Farmer City
  • Bond County CUSD 2, Greenville
  • Bourbonnais SD 53, Bourbonnais
  • * Bright Beginnings, Minonk
  • * Bright Beginnings Preschool and Childcare, Highland
  • Canton CUSD 66, Canton
  • Carbondale Elementary SD 95, Carbondale
  • * Carlinville CUSD 1, Carlinville
  • Carlyle CUSD 1, Carlyle
  • * Carmi Pre-K/Carmi-White County CUSD 5, Carmi
  • * Carole Robertson Center, Chicago
  • Carroll, JoDaviess, Stephenson ROE, Freeport
  • Carterville CUSD 5, Carterville
  • * Catholic Charities, Chicago
  • * CCSD 181, Burr Ridge
  • * Center for New Horizons, Chicago
  • * Champaign County Head Start, Urbana
  • * Champaign Unit 4 Schools Pre-K Program, Champaign
  • * Chicago Commons, Chicago
  • Chicago Heights SD 170, Chicago Heights
  • * Chicago Youth Centers, Chicago
  • * Child Care Resource & Referral, Joliet
  • * Children’s Learning Center, DeKalb
  • * Christopher House, Chicago
  • * City of Chicago Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
  • City of Chicago SD 299, Chicago
  • * Connecting Kids Preschool, Wilmette Public SD 39, Wilmette
  • Cook County SD 130, Blue Island
  • * Crawford’s Daycare, Carol Stream
  • Cuba SD 3, Cuba
  • * Cuddle Care, Inc., Riverdale
  • * CUSD 300, deLacey Family Education Center, Carpentersville
  • Dallas City CUSD 336, Dallas City
  • * Danville Area Community College Child
  • Development Center, Danville
  • Danville CCSD 118, Danville
  • * Darling Day Care, Lombard
  • Decatur SD 61, Decatur
  • DeKalb CUSD 428, DeKalb
  • * Discovery School, O’Fallon
  • * District 146 Early Learning, Tinley Park
  • * District 186 Early Start Pre-K, Springfield
  • Dolton SD 149, Calumet City
  • * Dwight Common SD 232, Dwight
  • * Early Childhood Developmental
  • Enrichment Center/Arlington Heights SD 25, Arlington Heights
  • * Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment Center/Mount Prospect SD 57, Mount Prospect
  • * Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment Center/Palatine CCSD 15, Palatine
  • * Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
  • Center/Prospect Heights CCSD 23, Prospect Heights
  • * Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
  • Center /River Trails CCSD 26, Mount Prospect
  • * Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
  • Center /Wheeling CCSD 21, Wheeling
  • * Early Learning Center – Springfield Public Schools 186, Springfield
  • East Alton SD 13, East Alton
  • East Dubuque CUSD 119, East Dubuque
  • East Richland CUSD 1, Olney
  • Edwardsville CUSD 7, Edwardsville
  • * Effingham CUSD 40, Effingham
  • Egyptian CUSD 5, Tamms
  • Eldorado CUSD 4, Eldorado
  • * Elgin Child and Family Resource Center, Elgin
  • Elgin School District U-46, Elgin
  • * Elite Childcare and Center, Saint Joseph
  • * Elmhurst Academy, Elmhurst
  • Erie CUSD 1, Erie
  • * Erie Neighborhood House, Chicago
  • * Faith Lutheran Preschool, Godfrey
  • * Family Daycare, Aurora
  • * First Start, Westmont
  • * First Step Child Care Center, Inc., Richton°Park
  • * First United Methodist Child Care Center, Champaign
  • * Ford-Iroquois Preschool Cooperative/I-KAN ROE, Milford
  • Four Rivers Special Ed. District, Jacksonville
  • * Fox Valley Home Day Care, Batavia
  • * Fox Valley Montessori School, Aurora
  • * Frank Family Daycare, Carol Stream
  • Freeburg CCSD 70, Freeburg
  • * Freeport SD 145/Taylor Park Elementary, Freeport
  • * Gads Hill Center, Chicago
  • Galesburg CUSD 5, Galesburg
  • Genoa Kingston CUSD 424, Genoa
  • * Got Tots, Lombard
  • Hamilton County CUSD 10, McLeansboro
  • Hamilton-Jefferson County ROE 25, Mount°Vernon
  • Harlem CUSD 122, Loves Park
  • Harrison SD 36, Wonder Lake
  • Harvard CUSD 50, Harvard
  • Harvey SD 152, Harvey
  • * Havanna CUSD 126, Havana
  • Hawthorn SD 73, Vernon Hills
  • * Henderson-Mercer-Warren ROE 27 Early Learning Project, Monmouth
  • High Mount SD 116, Swansea
  • Hillsboro CUSD 3, Hillsboro
  • Hoover-Schrum SD 157, Calumet City
  • * Howard Area Community Center, Chicago
  • Huntley SD 158, Huntley
  • * Illinois Action for Children, Chicago
  • Indian Creek CUSD 425, Shabbona
  • * Indian Prairie SD 204, Naperville
  • Indian Springs SD 109, Justice
  • * Innovative Technology Education Fund, St. Louis, MO
  • Iroquois County CUSD 9, Watseka
  • * Iroquois West CUSD 10, Gilman
  • * Jack and Jill Child Development Center, Belleville
  • Jonesboro CCSD 43, Jonesboro
  • * Kankakee SD 111, Kankakee/Head Start Program, Kankakee
  • * Katie’s Kids Learning Center, Normal
  • * Kiddie Kollege of Fairfield, Fairfield
  • * Kid’s Kingdom, Oblong
  • * Kool Kids Day Care, Troy
  • * Korean American Community Services, Chicago
  • * La Petite Academy, Champaign
  • LeRoy CUSD 2, LeRoy
  • Litchfield CUSD 12, Litchfield
  • * Little Prince Day Care, Villa Park
  • * Livingston County Special Services Unit, Pontiac
  • Lombard Elementary SD 44, Lombard
  • Lovington CUSD 303, Lovington
  • * Lutheran Social Services of Illinois, Chicago
  • * Lutheran Social Services of Illinois, Des Plaines
  • Macomb CUSD 185, Macomb
  • * Mary Crane Center, Chicago
  • * MDO/ABC Preschool, Sycamore
  • * Metropolitan Family Services, Chicago
  • Midstate Special Education, Taylorville
  • * Milestones Early Learning Center & Preschool, Bloomington
  • Milford CCSD 280, Milford
  • Momence CUSD 1, Momence
  • Morton SD 709, Morton
  • Mundelein Elementary SD 75, Mundelein
  • Murphysboro CUSD 186, Carbondale
  • Nashville CCSD 49, Nashville
  • * New Athens Pre-K, New Athens SD 60, New Athens
  • New Berlin CUSD 16, New Berlin
  • Northwest Special Education District, Freeport
  • Oblong CUSD 4, Oblong
  • * O’Fallon CCSD 90, O’Fallon
  • Oglesby Elementary SD 125, Oglesby
  • Olympia CUSD 16, Stanford
  • Orland SD 135, Orland Park
  • * Over the Rainbow, Washington
  • Palos Heights SD 128, Palos Heights
  • * PASS Preschool, Freeport
  • Paxton-Buckley-Loda CUSD 10, Paxton
  • Pekin SD 108, Pekin
  • * Peoria County Bright Futures, Dunlap District 323, Dunlap
  • * Peoria County Bright Futures, Illini Bluffs District 327, Glasford
  • * Peoria County Bright Futures, Norwood District 63, Peoria
  • * Peoria County Bright Futures, Peoria Heights District 325, Peoria Heights
  • * Peoria County Bright Futures, Pleasant Valley District 62, Peoria
  • * Peoria SD 150, Valeska Hinton Early Childhood Education Center, Peoria
  • * Player Early Childhood Center, Indian Springs School District 109, Justice
  • * Prairie Children Preschool/Indian Prairie School District 204, Aurora
  • * Pre-K At Risk Program/Marquardt School District 15, Glendale Heights
  • Princeville CUSD 326, Princeville
  • Queen Bee SD 16, Glendale Heights
  • Quincy SD 172, Quincy
  • * Rend Lake College Foundations Children’s Center, Ina
  • * Richland Community College, Decatur
  • Robinson CUSD 2, Robinson
  • * Rockford Early Childhood Program, Rockford District 205, Rockford
  • Rockton SD 140, Rockton
  • * SAL Child Care Connection, Peoria
  • * Salvation Army Child Care, Chicago
  • * Salvation Army Red Shield Head Start, Chicago
  • Savanna CUSD 300, Savanna
  • Schaumburg CCSD 54, Schaumburg
  • * Schaumburg Park District, Schaumburg
  • * School Readiness Center Preschool, Naperville
  • Schuyler SD 1, Rushville
  • * See Saw Day Care Center, Burlington
  • * Shiloh Elementary Pre-K Program, Shiloh Village SD 85, Shiloh
  • * Shining Stars Christian Preschool, Montgomery
  • Silvis SD 34, Silvis
  • * Somerset Family Childcare
  • * Southern Region Early Childhood Programs/
  • Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • Southern Seven Head Start, Ullin
  • * Southwestern Illinois College (SWIC), Kids Club, Belleville
  • St. Anne CCSD 256, St. Anne
  • STARNET Region I & III, Macomb
  • STARNET Region IV, Belleville
  • * St. Barnabas Christian Preschool, Cary
  • * Step By Step Inc., Alton
  • Sterling CUSD 5, Sterling
  • * Summit Early Learning Center, Elgin
  • * Teresa’s Daycare, West Chicago
  • * The Learning Tree Child Care Center, Elgin
  • * The Learning Tree Child Care Center, Huntley
  • * The Learning Tree Early Childhood School, Lake Zurich
  • * Thunderbird Preschool, Crystal Lake
  • * Township High School District 211, Palatine
  • * Triad CUSD #2, Troy
  • Trico CUSD 176, Campbell Hill
  • * Tri-Point CUSD #6J, Kempton
  • * Troy Early Childhood Center, Troy
  • * Two Rivers Head Start Agency, Aurora
  • * Uni-Press Kindercottage, East St. Louis
  • * Unity Point School #140, Carbondale
  • * Urbana SD 116, Urbana
  • * Valley View Early Childhood Center, Valley
  • View CUSD 365U, Romeoville
  • Vienna Elementary SD 55, Vienna
  • Virginia CUSD 64, Virginia
  • VIT CUSD 2, Table Grove
  • * West Chicago School District 33, Early Learning Center, West Chicago
  • West Richland SD 2, Noble
  • * Willow Family Child Care, Wheaton
  • * Winfield District 34 Tiger Cub Preschool, Winfield
  • Winnebago CUSD 323, Winnebago
  • * Woodford County Special Education Association, Metamora
  • * YMCA Garfield Center, Chicago
  • * Zion Lutheran School, Bethalto

Thank you to our editor and consultant:

  • Editor: Kevin Dolan, Illinois Early Learning Project, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Finally, but by no means last, a special thank you to Gaye Gronlund, nationally known early childhood expert and author, for helping us make the revised standards come alive in Illinois as she worked tirelessly and enthusiastically in guiding the workgroup and field testing programs and participants.
  • We wish to thank everyone who participated in the revision of the IELDS. We have striven to make this list as complete as possible. If your program was not included on this list, we apologize for the oversight. Please let us know so we can update this list in future printings of the Standards.